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Have ‘Phun’ with Phunky Pharaohs!

Phunky Pharaohs!

Take your children back in time to the great age of the Ancient Egyptian Pharaohs… BUT… with a ‘phunky kinda pheel’!

Your children will love this new song about Ancient Egypt from Primary Songs which is packed with snippets of information ripe for further research, and they will delight in the rather interesting method of extracting the Pharaoh’s brain!
Whether you want a brilliant new song to support your Ancient Egypt topic or simply one that your children will have ‘phun’ singing, here are a few tips to get teaching right away!

1. Use some of the names as a warm up
You can use the rhythms of some of the more interesting Pharaoh names, such as Tutankhamun, Rameses and Takelot, not only to practise their pronunciation but to get mouth muscles moving, good breathing and posture, ready to start singing. You could set up a repeated pattern and change from one word to another or give words to different groups/rows and layer them.

2. Listen to the vocal track
Get the children enthusiastic by letting them listen to the vocal track. This track is sung by ordinary primary children who enjoy singing and is deliberately not perfect so that your children can relate to them. Unfortunately with some songs children find trained adult voices rather funny, so my intention is to make the vocal tracks of the songs more relatable. I also find that children want to move when they hear the track, which is great and gets them wanting to sing it.

3. Start with the chorus
There is nothing to say you have to start at the beginning of a song! The chorus is catchy and a good starting point, alternating between two notes with some repetition. It also uses part of the harmonic minor scale that is a popular feature of Eastern-type music.

4. Move on to the verse

Once the chorus has been mastered, you can then move on to the verse which also uses features of the harmonic minor scale. It is a good idea to take make sure that the first words at the start of each verse are in time, so I start by counting the children in until they know it well. Also it is useful to practise the notes G A> B and C D> E separately as these can be quite tricky intervals to pitch.

4. To sing or not to sing the 3rd verse?
The third verse uses a different melody to introduce lots of Egyptian Pharaohs with really interesting names! Some will be familiar but most not. This is a great opportunity for the children to carry out their own research on these historical figures but also a chance to have fun with the words when singing the song! Listening to the verse on the vocal track might help with the pronunciation and also fitting the words with the melody, but if you are teaching younger children, you might wish not to sing this verse and use it as an instrumental instead. Your children could make up their own movements, as mine did, and have lots of ‘phun’!

5.The last note!
At the end of the song the last line ‘Boogie down inside a pyramid’ finishes on an E two notes above middle C. If your children are good singers they could aim to use the E an octave and two notes above middle C if they want to be adventurous and end on a high!

So have lots of ‘phun’ singing Phunky Pharaohs and let me know how you get on. ‘Pheel phree’ to send a tweet or an email – I love to hear!